Visible and Invisible Civic Engagement with Older Adults (60 plus) in Low-income Communities in Liverpool

By Louise Hardwick and Lynn Hancock.

Published by The International Journal of Aging and Society

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: June 9, 2015 $US5.00

The aim of this collaborative study, with Riverside Housing Association in the North West of England, was to explore the impact (if any) of austerity measures on the support available to people aged 60+ in low-income communities in Liverpool. This article reports the findings of a qualitative study exploring older adults’ perceptions of statutory, voluntary, private and community-based provision, and the support available from acquaintances, neighbours, friends, and family members not living in the same home. The research revealed how housing associations had become the first-port-of-call for coordinating the support needs of tenants in the context of public sector service fragmentation and withdrawal, the depletion of voluntary sector support, and the unaffordability of private sector services. Our qualitative data also revealed the threat posed to housing associations, the erosion of both low-income communities themselves and the informal support networks available, and older people’s resolute attempts to stem the tide of isolation and desolation.

Keywords: Austerity, Older People, Civic Engagement, Public Services

The International Journal of Aging and Society, Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2015, pp.65-75. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: June 9, 2015 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 299.426KB)).

Louise Hardwick

Lecturer, Department of Sociology, Social Policy, and Criminology, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK

Dr. Lynn Hancock

Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology, Social Policy, and Criminology, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK