The Dynamics of Daily Living Limitations and Care at the End of Life: A Transition Matrices Approach

By Malgorzata Kalbarczyk-Steclik and Anna Nicinska.

Published by The International Journal of Aging and Society

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Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: June 11, 2015 $US5.00

In this study we analysed how daily living limitations and care providers change at the end of life in Europe. Transition matrices for the number of ADLs and IADLs performed with difficulty and for the relation to care providers were obtained using data on deceased individuals from the Study of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We found that most individuals experienced increased daily living limitations, both with respect to ADLs and IADLs. About half of the individuals without daily living limitations started to experience at least one limitation in the last year of life. Non-kin care providers were observed more often in the last year of life than in the previous year, but kin were still responsible for most of the end-of-life care. Two types of care transitions prevailed. First, individuals who had received all care from kin in the previous year of life started to receive care also from non-kin in the last year of life. Second, non-kin care in the previous year of life was often taken over by kin in the last year of life. These transitions at the end of life imply substantial differences in daily living limitations and care between the last year of life and the previous year.

Keywords: End of Life, Care, ADL, IADL

The International Journal of Aging and Society, Volume 5, Issue 4, December 2015, pp.15-22. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: June 11, 2015 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 336.857KB)).

Malgorzata Kalbarczyk-Steclik

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

Anna Nicinska

Assistant Professor and Chair of Population Economics and Demography, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, Warsawa, Poland